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Weird wedding superstitions you've never heard before

We reveal the craziest wedding traditions

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Weird wedding traditions and superstitions
Chimney sweeps are good to have around on you big day. Image: Dottie photography

Can you make sense of these weird wedding superstitions? Decide for yourself if any of these big day traditions are worth keeping!

Chim chimney
Seeing a chimney sweep on your wedding day is supposedly good luck. We can't say the same for getting sott on your wedding dress though.

Crying on your wedding day
Weirdly, crying on your wedding day is thought to be lucky. This is supposed to symbolise the fact that the bride has now shed all her tears and can enter into the marriage without sadness. As long as you have a good waterproof mascara we say release those tears of joy!

INCREDIBLE WEDDING TRADITIONS FROM AROUND THE WORLD

Crossing a nun of monk’s path
A bride who crosses the path of a nun or monk on her wedding day is said to be cursed with a life dependent on charity - better find a black cat quick.

A little sweetness
According the Greeks, tucking a sugar cube into your gloves will bless your marriage with sweetness.

No knives please
A wedding gift of knives is supposed to be supremely unlucky as it signifies a broken union. If you do have a kitchen knife set on your gift list take it off now!

WEDDING TRADITIONS IT'S OKAY TO BREAK

Eight-legged friend
Finding a spider on your wedding dress is supposed to be a good omen according to folklore. You need your new husband around to get remove him carefully though.

No bow ties
Forget hipster bow ties – apparently it is unlucky for your groom to wear one as he might “fly away”.

Half past
If you're a susperstitious type, plan for your ceremony o start on the half hour. It is good luck to have the hands of the clock travelling up instead of down during the ceremony.

Stay awake
Supposedly the spouse who falls asleep first on the wedding night, will be the first to die. Errrr, coffee all round.

Want more ideas? Here are seven traditions that need to make a comeback and 10 ways to defy wedding traditions

 
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